29-32 Weeks Pregnant

By about 32 weeks the baby is usually lying with its head pointing downwards, ready for birth.

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29-32 Weeks Pregnant

Your baby's development in pregnancy

Your baby continues to be very active at this stage, and you'll probably be aware of lots of movements. There's no set number of movements you should feel each day – every pregnancy is different.

You should be aware of your baby's own pattern of movements. If this pattern changes, contact your midwife or hospital to tell them.

The sucking reflex is developing by now and your baby can suck its thumb or fingers.

The baby is growing plumper, and the skin begins to look less wrinkled and much smoother.

The white, greasy vernix and the soft, furry lanugo (fine hair) that have covered your baby's skin for some time begin to disappear.

Your baby's eyes can focus now. The lungs are developing rapidly, but your baby wouldn't be fully able to breathe on its own until about 36 weeks.

By about 32 weeks, the baby is usually lying with their head pointing downwards, ready for birth. This is known as cephalic presentation. If your baby isn't lying head down at this stage, it's not a cause for concern – there's still time for them to turn.

The amount of amniotic fluid in your uterus is increasing, and your baby is still swallowing fluid and passing it out as urine.

Your body at 29-32 weeks of pregnancy

As your bump pushes up against your lungs and you have extra weight to carry around, you may feel breathless.

Leg cramps at night are common at around 29-32 weeks. You may find it hard to sleep because you can't get comfortable. Try lying curled up on your side with a pillow between your legs and a cushion under your bump to see if it feels more comfortable. You might also find you need to pee a lot.

If this is your first baby, your midwife or doctor will measure the size of your womb and check which way up the baby is when you're 31 weeks pregnant.

They'll also measure your blood pressure, test your urine for protein, and discuss the results of any screening tests from your last appointment.

Warning signs during pregnancy

High blood pressure and pre-eclampsia

High blood pressure and protein in the urine are signs of pre-eclampsia, which can be life threatening if untreated.

Severe itching

Severe itching at any stage of pregnancy can be a sign of the rare liver disorder obstetric cholestasis.

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