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Health

Why am I so lazy?

19 November 2019 in Health

Contents

Is laziness a personality trait or a set of behaviours and habits that you pick up throughout life? Laziness is something that’s still not fully understood, but this doesn’t mean there’s nothing you can do to feel less lazy.

Laziness means different things to different people, so the first step in figuring out why you feel so lazy is identifying what laziness means to you. For some it's a lack of interest in things, while for others it's tiredness, feeling low or a sense of being disconnected.

It’s important to identify what laziness looks and feels like to someone because sometimes a behaviour we dismiss as laziness can be a symptom of an underlying condition that needs medical attention.

So are you just lazy by nature or could your laziness be due to something else entirely?

What causes laziness?

Lazy tendencies may be caused by many things, such as:

  • your lifestyle or personality
  • a psychological problem
  • a physical problem

What might be causing your laziness?

Did you only start to feel lazy recently?

If yes, and you have other symptoms, your laziness may be due to a medical condition. However, if lazy habits and behaviours have been a part of your life for many years, they may be caused by lifestyle factors or general behavioural tendencies.

Do you just have lazy tendencies?

If you think you’ve always been prone to laziness, this may suggest it’s a personality trait. Laziness doesn’t need to be a negative thing, but if your lazy tendencies are something you’d like to change, there are things you can do. For guidance on making positive life changes, take a look at our article on how to set a health goal and achieve it.

Psychological causes of laziness

If you frequently experience low mood, tiredness or feel a lack of motivation, this may be caused by a mental health condition such as:

What you’re experiencing may not be laziness at all but a symptom of a mental health condition. If you’ve lost interest in many things and struggle to find ways to lift your mood, speak to a doctor.

Lifestyle causes of laziness

Could your lifestyle be making you lazy? For example, a poor diet, too much alcohol and lack of good quality sleep can all leave you feeling tired and unmotivated.

Make small changes to your lifestyle to try and improve how you feel. If you think poor sleep may be to blame, why not start a sleep routine? These tips on how to create the best bedtime routine may help. And if you suspect your alcohol consumption is too high, try cutting back on how much you drink. Find more information about safe drinking levels.

Stress can also lead to poor sleep, which in turn can make you feel tired and lacking motivation. A study by the Mental Health Foundation found that up to a third of the UK population is sleep deprived due to stress. If your stress levels are high, speak to a doctor.

Physical causes of laziness

If you’re feeling lazy, it could be due to tiredness caused by a medical condition. Medical conditions that can cause tiredness include:

Thyroid disorders or vitamin deficiencies can leave you feeling tired and low in energy. If you’re worried your laziness may be caused by a medical condition or you have other symptoms that you’re concerned about, see a doctor.

In most cases, there’s a reason behind a person’s laziness. If you feel it creeping up on you, take a step back and assess the situation. Are you lacking energy for a reason? Are you exhausted from everything life has been throwing at you lately? Are you overwhelmed by something, or simply uninspired by what you’re doing?

Once you know the cause, you can take steps to do something about it.

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Important: Our website provides useful information but is not a substitute for medical advice. You should always seek the advice of your doctor when making decisions about your health.